Stay Engaged - Learning Options

Here you’ll find a whole host of training and CPD ideas to consider from organisations across the sector.

  • Machine learning in archives

    Internet Librarian International will hold a half-day virtual bite-sized session on 22nd September with three topical, hour-long sessions which include a fascinating insight into some pioneering experiments with machine learning in archives. The session is aimed at archivists, librarians and info managers.

    Join us from where ever you are in the world, next Wednesday 22 September. If you can't make the date, ticket holders will have access to the session recordings to watch later. Click here for the programme and tickets. If you have any questions, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • 2021 Annual Digital Lecture registration open: Data Feminism and the Archive

    Registration is now open for The National Archives Research’s 2021 Annual Digital Lecture which will take place online on 27 October 2021 at 16:00 BST.

    Exploration of digital ideas is an important part of our archival work. The Annual Digital Lecture offers the opportunity to hear from a leading speaker on a topic related to digital research, in addition to highlighting the innovative digital work happening at The UK National Archives. This year, we will be publishing three blogs about our digital research in the lead up to the lecture, so be sure to follow us on Twitter.

    This year's speaker is Lauren F. Klein, Emory University. She will be speaking on 'Data Feminism and the Archive'. Lauren Klein is an associate professor in the departments of English and Quantitative Theory & Methods at Emory University, where she also directs the Digital Humanities Lab.

    Click here to register for the event. Joining details will be sent to attendees a few days before the event.

    Join the conversation online using the hashtag #AnnualDigiLecture. If you have any questions, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
  • Webinar: Getting to Grips with Your Photographic Collection: Negatives - 22 September at 12.00-12.30pm

    Please click here to register.

    Join us for our latest webinar on Getting to Grips with Your Photographic Collection: this month how to manage your negatives.

    From identifying photographic type and how to care for them to dating images through fashion, these sessions will explore many different aspects of managing photographs in archive collections. Designed for archivists and anyone with photographs in their collection, the webinars will give practical advice from experts, and offer guidance on caring, storing, and cataloguing items.

    Each session will take place on Zoom and run for around thirty minutes, featuring a short presentation with plenty of opportunity for your questions.

    This session will focus on photographic negatives. Negatives are found in most photographic collections. As the first generation image produced by a photographer they are at the heart of the photographer’s intent. In this webinar we will look at their properties and some of the associated implications.

    We are delighted to be working with Susie Clark, photographic conservator, to create a series of workshops that will give you insight and advice on managing your photographic collections.

    You can catch up with our previous webinars with Susie here.

    Susie Clark ACR ICON is an accredited Photographic Conservator and Consultant with many years of experience. She has worked for a large number of institutions, organizations and private individuals in Britain and abroad. She was the recipient of the Museums and Galleries Commission Jerwood Conservation Award for Research and Innovation for her work on the conservation of wet collodion positives. She was also the conservator for the Collaborative Research Project between the National Science and Media Museum and the Getty Conservation Institute looking at characteristics of different photographic processes. She has taught for many organizations and written for many publications. She is currently Assistant Co-ordinator for the ICOM-CC Photographic Materials Group and a committee member of the York Consortium for Conservation and Craftmanship which provides bursaries. She was previously a committee member of the Film and Sound Group of the Society of Archivists. She was recently an Honorary Teaching Fellow for the Centre for Archive and Information Studies at the University of Dundee.

  • Latest training and events from The UK National Archives

    Introduction to apprenticeships - 13 October (Part of our inclusive recruitment training offer, delivered by Creative & Cultural Skills)

    This session will help you understand more about apprenticeships and how they work. It will give you a solid foundation to understanding apprenticeships, with practical steps to introducing them into your organisation.

    Click here to book your place.

    Inclusive recruitment - individual advice clinics - 3 November (Part of our inclusive recruitment training offer, delivered by Creative & Cultural Skills)

    We are now offering advice clinics for archive professionals in the UK. These one-to-one advice clinics will allow you to build your understanding of recruitment best practices and to ask questions specific to your organisation.

    Click here to book your place.

    A manager's guide to apprenticeships - 3 November (Part of our inclusive recruitment training offer, delivered by Creative & Cultural Skills) This training is for archive professionals who are new to managing apprentices, or who would like to refresh their understanding. During the session, attendees will learn about areas such as recruiting and managing apprentices, and how best to work with training providers.

    Click here to book your place.

  • 3D Data, CAD files and GIS Data: Three DPC Technology Watch Guidance Notes now available on general release

    The Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) has made the next three Technology Watch Guidance Notes in the new 'Data Type' series available on general release today. The topics covered in the set are: 3D Data, CAD files and GIS Data.

    Authored by staff at Artefactual Systems in collaboration with the DPC and developed in conjunction with the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, each of the Guidance Notes in the Data Type series is designed to provide a primer on the current state of community knowledge about types of data commonly encountered by those seeking to preserve digital holdings.

    Paul Wheatley, Head of Research and Practice for the DPC and co-editor of the series, says: "There is so much information about the preservation of different types of data out there, but it can be hard for the practitioner to know where to start or to find the right resources. These notes are intended to provide a basic level of information but also point people to other useful references on the topic. We are really keen to hear feedback from the community both now and in the future so that we can maintain these notes as a useful resource for the community."

    Click here to

  • AfL Online Seminar: St Christopher’s Oral History Project (Wed 29 Sep at 6pm)

    At Archives for London’s next online seminar, Daniel Albon will be introducing the Oral History Project at St Christopher’s Hospice in South London.

    Thanks to the generous support of the National Lottery Heritage Fund, St Christopher’s intends to tell the story of the Hospice by capturing oral history testimonies from the variety of people who helped to shape the history and life of the organisation. These recordings will be made accessible to the public and will culminate in a ground-breaking multimedia exhibition at St. Christopher’s CARE which will celebrate these different stories and the history of the Hospice. There will also be a permanent static display in the main hospice foyer which will be a central focal point for the project, and the continued life and history of St. Christopher’s.

    Daniel Albon is the Oral History Lead at St Christopher’s Hospice who manages the Oral History Project which captures the life and history of the organisation. Daniel was a Digital Archivist at London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) looking after the Film and Sound Collections, and also an Archivist at LMA looking after the Anglo-Jewish Collections. He was also a Curator at the RAF Museum London where he curated an exhibition about the long distance record breaking aviator, Sir Alan Cobham.

    Date and Time: Wednesday 29th September 2021, 6pm – 7.15pm

    Location: Online on Zoom

    Cost: Free for AfL Members; £6 for non-members

    How to book: Click here to book.  

  • Weekend workshop on medieval records, Oxford, 15-16 Jan 2022

    Dr Charlotte Berry is running a face to face study weekend coming up in Oxford in January 2022 for those members with interests in medieval records. Reading the Past: Introduction to Writing, Making and Keeping Medieval Records | Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. Click here for more details and to register.

  • The Changing Face of Nursing: Black Nurses in Surrey Hospitals - Zoom talk with Surrey History Centre: Friday 1 October 2021, 5.30-6.45pm

     A talk for Black History Month by Dr Catherine Babikian, with Surrey History Centre

    From its launch, the National Health Service relied on the labour of thousands of nurses, doctors, and health care workers from overseas. Surrey hospitals were no exception. For Black History Month, this talk draws on the Surrey History Centre's rich health care collections to explore the experiences of Black nurses in Surrey. The talk will begin with some framing context for how and why Black nurses from the Caribbean and Africa came to staff the NHS, before diving into the archives of Surrey hospitals such as West Park Hospital, Epsom, and Netherne Hospital, Coulsdon. Click here for more details and to book tickets (£5.00).

    Dr Catherine Babikian is an American historian researching the relationship between migration and health care. Her PhD thesis examined the history of overseas nurses in the NHS and the impact of nurse migration on Britain and its former colonies.

  • Registration Now Open Through December 2021 for Novice to Know-How: Digital Preservation Skills for Beginners

    The Digital Preservation Coalition is pleased to announce that registration is now open through December 2021 for "Novice to Know-How: Digital Preservation Skills for Beginners" and the additional course "Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content".

    Part of The National Archives' digital capacity building strategy, 'Plugged In, Powered Up,' the Novice to Know-How learning pathway aims to provide beginners with the skills required to develop and implement simple digital preservation workflows within their organisation.

    It starts with a broad introduction to digital preservation issues and describes the measures we can take to address these. It then delves into potential workflows in more detail, examining the issues to consider, steps to take, and simple technological solutions that can deployed. An emphasis is placed on free, easy-to-use solutions, and includes a number of tool demos. Course content is provided as mix of video, text, and quizzes. The course on "Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content" aims to provide learners with an understanding of the broad range of issues to be considered when providing access, as well as the ability to implement simple access provisions.

    "Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content" has been part of the main learning pathway for those registering for the April 2021 intake onwards. The course is also available as a stand-alone for those who completed the original learning pathway prior to April, and for those specifically interested in the topic of providing access but do not want to complete the full learning pathway.

    Priority places are available for learners from the UK Archives Sector or DPC Members and registration is free for all learners.

    Click here to register for the full Novice to Know-How learning pathway or "Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content" please visit the page below.

  • Warburg Institute: Specialised Language and Palaeography Courses 2021-2022

    The Warburg Institute's weekly specialised French, Italian, Latin and Classical Greek training courses for 2021-2022 are now open for booking. This year we are also offering weekly Latin Palaeography and Renaissance Italian Palaeography for students with good existing knowledge of Latin and Italian. All courses will meet online via the Zoom platform, and are open to everyone. If you are not sure of your language level, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for a placement test.

    Specialised French for Renaissance Research (Beginners and Intermediate) & Advanced Renaissance French Autumn 2021 & Spring 2022 Designed to help students gain, increase or improve access to historical scholarship on the Renaissance and primary textual sources for the period. Beginner and intermediate classes provide a grounding in fundamental French grammar and vocabulary, developing students' reading and translation skills, and introducing them to relevant specialised language. The advanced class will consolidate students' understanding of the grammar and vocabulary of Renaissance French, with a focus on translating authentic source material into English.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/specialised-french-reading-renaissance-texts-beginners-and-intermediate-advanced-renaissance

    Specialised Italian for Renaissance Research (Beginners and Intermediate) & Advanced Renaissance Italian Autumn 2021 & Spring 2022 Designed to help students gain, increase or improve access to historical scholarship on the Renaissance and primary textual sources for the period. Beginner and intermediate classes provide a grounding in fundamental Italian grammar and vocabulary, developing students' reading and translation skills, and introducing them to relevant specialised language. The advanced class will consolidate students' understanding of the grammar and vocabulary of Renaissance Italian, with a focus on translating authentic source material into English.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/specialised-italian-reading-renaissance-texts-beginners-and-intermediate-advanced

    Late Medieval and Renaissance Latin (Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced) Autumn 2021 & Spring 2022 Designed to train students to read and understand late Medieval and Renaissance Latin documents. Depending on level, these classes will focus on vocabulary acquisition, grammar and syntax, and the forms commonly used by medieval and early modern texts. Students will be encouraged to consider the evolution of Latinity and to read the language with greater confidence.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/late-medieval-and-renaissance-latin-beginner-intermediate-advanced

    Renaissance Italian Palaeography

    Autumn 2021 & Spring 2022

    Designed to help students analyse handwritten vernacular textual sources in Italian for the Renaissance and Early Modern period. Students will be introduced to the basic principles of palaeography and the key scripts used to produce manuscripts and documents in Italy between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries, with an emphasis on developing the necessary skills to accurately transcribe unseen texts. No previous training in palaeography is expected, but students should have a solid grasp of modern Italian grammar and vocabulary and, ideally, some familiarity with Renaissance Italian.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/renaissance-italian-palaeography LAST FEW PLACES

    The above courses do not award CATS credits, but students at each level will be able to take a mock and final exam, and receive feedback, in late spring or early summer 2022, dates tbc. The exam will be taken online at home and not under "exam conditions".

    Latin Palaeography

    Autumn 2021; Spring 2022 tbc

    In this course we shall be reading reproductions of manuscripts written in Latin between the twelfth and seventeenth centuries and getting to know the letter forms, the systems of abbreviation and punctuation, and sometimes the relationship between a text and its illustration. The aim will be to familiarise the student with different forms of handwriting, and with the remarkably consistent repertoire of abbreviations used, so that they can confidently approach any manuscript written in the Middle Ages and the early modern period. No previous acquaintance with manuscripts is expected, but the student is expected to have a good knowledge of Latin grammar and syntax.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/latin-palaeography

    Classical Greek - Beginners

    Autumn 2021; Spring 2022 tbc

    An eight-session online course across the Autumn Term in Classical Greek for complete beginners. A principal aim will be to equip students with an essential set of linguistic navigational tools, which can serve as a springboard for further study of both language and literature. An initial level of competence in the language will, it is hoped, also engender a corresponding degree of confidence when it comes to encounters with Greek in Renaissance texts. Greek was a highly prized, but also deeply contested language right through the early modern period, and a further dimension of the course will be a consideration of the implications of using Greek during the 14th to the 17th centuries.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/classical-greek-beginners

    Classical Greek Texts

    Autumn 2021; Spring 2022 tbc

    A new eight-session online reading course in Classical Greek for advanced level students. It is a text-based course, and the focus in Term 1 (Autumn 2021) will be Euripides' Trojan Women. Students will be expected to prepare passages in advance, which we will then read together, and discuss, taking into account literary, linguistic and contextual perspectives.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/classical-greek-texts

    The above courses do not award CATS credits and are not examined.

    Places are also available for our 5-day September 2021 intensive courses:

    Women and the Invention of the Renaissance

    13-17 September 2021: 3.00-5.00pm: online via zoom. With Dr Jessica Maratsos (Keith Sykes Research Fellow in Italian Studies, Pembroke College, Cambridge) Drawing on recent scholarship with a wide range of textual, visual, and material culture, this course will reconsider the crucial part women played in creating and shaping Renaissance culture, often in defiance of the constraints of their time.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/event/24534

    Renaissance Italian 5-day Intensive

    20-24 September 2021: 1.00-3.00pm & 4.00-5.00pm: online via zoom. With Dr Matthew Coneys (Warburg Institute) The course is designed for students who already possess a solid understanding of modern Italian. It will focus on the grammar, vocabulary and orthography of Renaissance Italian, with the aim of helping students to navigate primary sources produced in a range of social and regional contexts between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries.

    Details and booking: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/event/24513

    The running of all courses is dependent on student uptake, so please book your place as soon as possible and feel free to spread the word among colleagues and contacts.

  • Latest training and events from The UK National Archives

    Here are the details of the latest free training and events from The UK National Archives.

    Inclusive recruitment - individual advice clinics - 1 September (Part of our inclusive recruitment training offer, delivered by Creative & Cultural Skills)

    We are now offering advice clinics for archive professionals in the UK. These one-to-one advice clinics will allow you to build your understanding of recruitment best practices and to ask questions specific to your organisation.

    Book your place: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/inclusive-recruitment-individual-advice-clinics-tickets-162556407591

    Introduction to apprenticeships - 2 September (Part of our inclusive recruitment training offer, delivered by Creative & Cultural Skills)

    This session will help you understand more about apprenticeships and how they work. It will give you a solid foundation to understanding apprenticeships, with practical steps to introducing them into your organisation.

    Book your place: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/introduction-to-apprenticeships-tickets-167745418061

    Back in the saddle: getting your voice heard in the post-pandemic world - 10 September

    In this session, we will discuss returning to the workplace as staff and services adjust to new ways of working. Many of us are thinking about how to remind our stakeholders of the importance and relevance of our services - join us to hear from colleagues who have started work on getting 'back in the saddle', and share your concerns, ideas and ambitions with colleagues. This event is primarily aimed at those working with archives and records in the Higher Education sector. The event is co-hosted by the Higher Education Archive Programme (HEAP) and the Higher Education Information and Records Management Group (HEIRMG).

    Book your place: https://getting-your-voice-heard.eventbrite.co.uk<https://getting-your-voice-heard.eventbrite.co.uk/

  • RLUK Digital Shift Forum: new season of events announced

    A new season of events at the Digital Shift Forum. RLUK’s Digital Shift Forum (#RLUKDSF) brings together colleagues from across the information, research, cultural and heritage communities, and third and commercial sectors, to discuss the future of the digital shift in collections, services, and audiences.

    The series aims to promote cross-sector discussion and debate, to enable knowledge exchange, and inspire collaborative endeavour across sectors and communities, for the benefit of RLUK members and the wider research and information management communities. Recordings of previous Digital Shift Forum events can be viewed on the RLUK website.

    The Digital Shift Forum is free to attend and open to all.

    • The academic library and artificial intelligence: some possible futures – 15 September 2021, 14:00 – 15:00 (GMT): register here.  Andrew Cox, Senior Lecturer, Information School, University of Sheffield
    • Innovation in collections and practices through cross-sector collaboration: the RLUK/TNA professional fellows share their work – 28 September 2021, 14:00 – 15:30 (GMT): register here
    • Future-proofing the research library: Designing talent strategy for 2030 and beyond – 29 September 2021, 14:00 – 15:00 (GMT): register here. Tony Zanders, Founder and CEO, Skilltype
    • Introducing Skilltype: Modern talent management for the global GLAM sector – 6 October 2021, 14:00 – 15:00 (BST): register here.  Tony Zanders, Founder and CEO, Skilltype
    • Making the digital shift visible: Postprint and its implications – 20 October 2021, 14:00 – 15:00 (BST): register here. N. Katherine Hayles, Distinguished Research Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and James B. Duke Professor Emerita, Duke University
  • Book your place for the 2021 Gerald Aylmer Seminar

    Registration is now open for the next Gerald Aylmer Seminar, which will take place online on 17 September with the theme  'New Ways to Work: future directions for archival and historical practice'. The Gerald Aylmer Seminar is an annual one-day symposium jointly convened by The National Archives, The Royal Historical Society and The Institute of Historical Research. The Gerald Aylmer Seminar brings together historians and archivists to discuss topics of mutual interest, particularly the nature of archival research and the use of collections.

    This year's seminar theme is 'New Ways to Work - future directions for archival and historical practice'.

    The events of the past 18 months have fundamentally changed how, as archivists and historians, we now work - individually and collaboratively. In this year's Gerald Aylmer Seminar we invite archivists and historians of all kinds to come together to take stock of the extent, implications and future of these changes. Under the theme of 'New Ways to Work - future directions for archival and historical practice', we want to consider how archivists and historians are working now, having been forced to make difficult decisions, to adapt and often to innovate in what we do and how we engage with one another. But in addition to looking at what's changed, we are also looking to future ways of working: how do we best move forward in a relationship that won't 'return to normal'.

    As well as hearing from a range of expert speakers, attendees will have the opportunity to discuss vital questions about the future of historical and archival practice. Speakers will be responding to the theme of 'New Ways to Work' in short videos, to be released in early September.

    This event is free to attend, but booking is required. Click here to register.

  • Manage Your Collections in Discovery Webinar: 8th Sep 2021

    The National Archives will be holding a webinar on Discovery and Manage Your Collections (MYC) on Wednesday 8th September (10:30am-12pm) for archives who are interested in learning more about publishing collections information to Discovery or managing existing collections information they already have on Discovery.

    The workshop will include an overview of Discovery and a demo of MYC’s functionality, with a Q&A at the end. Event and registration details can be found here.  Any questions or queries or if you can't make the date of this webinar but would be interested in similar future events, please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. the MYC team.

  • Registration open: eArchiving Specifications event, 26 October 2021

    An event focused on the latest release of the eArchiving specifications will take place on 26th October. Click here to register.  

  • ARA Scotland’s next lunchtime webinar: Managing Orphan Works in a post-Brexit landscape.

    15th September, 13:00-14:00

    Online – Microsoft Teams

    Leaving the EU has impacted how Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAMs) in the UK manage their collections and online activities. Additionally, it has affected their collections in copyright where the rights holders are either unknown or cannot be traced, also known as ‘orphan works’.

    ARA Scotland is delighted to offer this lunchtime webinar with Naomi Korn. Naomi Korn is one of the UK’s leading experts in copyright, data protection and licensing. She has been supporting the public, corporate, education and charity sectors on rights management and rights exploitation for the last 20 years.

    Naomi Korn is also currently researching a part-time PhD at the University of Edinburgh which is examining the impact of Brexit on the management of orphan works amongst GLAMs. During this webinar Naomi will discuss this topic and some possible next steps for GLAMs following Brexit.

    This webinar will take the form of a presentation by Naomi Korn, followed by a Q&A chaired by the ARA Scotland training officer.

    This webinar is free for ARA members, and £5 for non-members. Members please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to book your space; for non-members, please Book Online, and be aware that ARA will not be offering invoices for this low fee event.

    If you have any questions please do get in touch, and we hope to see you there!.

  • Free Workshops in Audio Archives

    As part of Unlocking Our Sound Heritage, the National Library of Scotland and Scotland’s Sounds are delighted to introduce a series of free workshops for anyone wanting to learn more about working with sound collections. For more details and to sign up please see the Scotland’s Sounds Eventbrite page.

    Introduction to Audio Cataloguing

    Wednesday 11th 2pm-3pm

    Managing and Working with Archival Sounds

    Thursday 12th 10am-12noon

    Finding Scotland’s Sounds

    Tuesday 17th 2pm-3pm

    Intermediate Audio Cataloguing—Further Steps and Considerations

    Wednesday 18th 2pm-4pm

    Copyright and Data Protection in Sound Archiving

    Friday 20th 10am-12noon

    Non-discriminatory Library Cataloguing Practices

    Wednesday 25th 10am-11am

    Creating a Compelling Podcast through Archive Audio

    Thursday 26th 10am-12noon

  • TALK: 'Researching built environment in the archives of the Royal London Hospital', Amy Spencer, 16 September 2021

    Please join Barts Health NHS Trust Archives and Museums on Thursday 16th September for this free online talk on “Researching built environment in the archives of the Royal London Hospital” by Amy Spencer:

    18.00-19.00 GMT, Thursday 16 September 2021

    This event is free and will take place on Zoom. Please register here.

    Amy Spencer is an architectural historian working on the Survey of London, based at the Bartlett School of Architecture in University College London. The Survey is renowned for its longstanding series of volumes exploring the history of London’s built environment. Amy assisted with preparing a volume on Oxford Street (Vol. 53), published in 2020. She has researched the Royal London Hospital for the Survey's forthcoming volumes on Whitechapel (Vols 54 and 55), which are expected to be published in 2022. Amy is also a doctoral candidate at the Bartlett School of Architecture, researching the architectural history of University College London and its teaching hospital from 1825 to 1939.

    This is the third in a series of free online talks, organised by Barts Health NHS Trust Archives and Museums, from researchers who have conducted research using our collections. Visit our ‘Events’ page to find out about further talks as they are announced: https://www.bartshealth.nhs.uk/barts-health-archives and catch up on previous talks here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT04FD9Z5k_9_a-qqzD-DxQ

  • Latest Archives for Learning and Education Section (ALES) ARA Learning Blogs

    Archives are resources for teaching anti-racism

    London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) is a public research centre which specialises in the history of London. We are currently focusing on work with our audio collections as part of a UK-wide project 'Unlocking Our Sound Heritage’. LMA aims to digitally preserve almost half a million rare and at-risk sound recordings, keeping seminal speeches of Londoners safe for future generations.

    Find out more from Hannah Welch-Kemp Unlocking Our Sound Heritage: Learning and Engagement Coordinator London Metropolitan Archives on our blog here.

    After Law: Atrocity Archives, Dialogue, Young People Learning and Active Participation

    More than two decades of trials at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda led to the creation of a vast and diverse archive. This somewhat side-lined archive has great potential to contribute towards dialogue and community repair in Rwanda.

    Find out more from Dr Benjamin Thorn and keep an eye out for part 2 of his blog on ARA Learning here.  

  • The UK National Archives' Data Protection Toolkit for Archivists

    The UK National Archives' Data Protection Toolkit for Archivists, delivered by Naomi Korn, provides an options-based approach to making decisions about when and how to provide access to personal data held in archives.

    Click here to find out more and request free access to the toolkit here.

  • Inclusive recruitment advice clinics  - from 4 August

    To complement our inclusive recruitment training series, we are now offering one-to-one advice clinics to professionals working in a UK archive. These 30-minute conversations with an expert from Creative & Cultural Skills will allow you to ask questions specific to your organisation's situation and to receive tailored advice. Topics that you could discuss include apprenticeships, volunteers, workforce development policies or inclusive job descriptions.

    Click here to book your place:

  • Unlock your Audio Archives - Unlocking our Sound Heritage training for the south-west

    The Unlocking our Sound Heritage project team has announced that its two-day audio archive care, preservation and use trainings will be on:

    • 12 & 13 Oct at Gloucestershire Heritage Hub, Gloucester
    • 21 & 22 Oct at Devon Heritage Centre, Exeter
    • 1 & 2 Nov at Somerset Archives and Heritage Centre, Taunton
    • 8 & 9 Nov at Bristol Archives
    • 15 & 16 Nov at Bristol Archives

    Click here for full details and booking.

    They are small groups only (15 max) and in rooms that will allow social distancing for people’s comfort. They are aimed at workers and volunteers who care for audio archives. 

    Please ask anyone who books to indicate where they work or volunteer when registering, as preference is given to people actively working with archives (as opposed to interested members of the public).

    If you have any questions, please contact Katie Scaife, Project Manager – Unlocking our Sound Heritage This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

  • Seminar Series: The Shock of the Record, Archives and Truth

    The British Records Association (BRA) is contributing to the Institute of Historical Research (IHR) Partnership Seminars series in 2021 and 2022.

    These seminars, called ‘The Shock of the Record : Archives and Truth’ cover topics related to trust in archives and records, digital literacy and current scepticism of facts and evidence in our society.

    Details of the seminars are now available on the IHR website. The seminars are open to anyone with an interest in records and archives and can be booked online. Attendance is free of charge and the seminars are held on Zoom with live captioning.

    The Shock of the Record: Why Archives Matter held on 18 March 2021 is now available on YouTube. Click here.

    Who Creates the Record and Why? Evidence Under Attack held on 17 June 2021 is now available on YouTube. Click here.

    The recordings have fully transcribed captions.

    The next event is planned for the 11th November 2021 at 6PM (GMT) provisionally titled ‘Truth and Trust: Untruth especially in oppressive regimes’. Full details will be posted on the seminar series’ twitter account @ShockOfRecord and the IHR and BRA websites in the near future https://www.britishrecordsassociation.org.uk/.

  • Voices From Leonard Cheshire Webinar

    Watch Stephanie Nield, Archivist at disability charity Leonard Cheshire talk about running a digital volunteering and sound archive digitisation project during the Covid-19 pandemic in this free webinar. Click here.

    There is also the opportunity to view our exhibition film and find out more about our fascinating archive collections.

    This event was held as part of the National Lottery Heritage Fund and Foyle Foundation project ‘Resonate’.

    The recordings has fully transcribed captions.

  • Community Archives training videos available on YouTube

    Community Archives has added recorded versions of its recent training sessions to the Norfolk Record Office’s YouTube channel. This comprises the new Collections Management and Preservation sessions plus updated versions of the Cataloguing, Oral History and Digitisation sessions that we ran last year.

    All of the videos on the Community Archives project playlist can be found here - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIR5duwYdmi_ZyZi7yn7RNvBrd5bEkrpB

    Each recording will link to the relevant section on our Community Archives Toolkit, and also has an optional survey for viewers to complete.

  • Digitisation: TownsWeb Archiving Resources Round-Up

    TownsWeb Archiving has been working hard recently to identify and create the resources, information and guidance that it feels the industry most needs right now. This content has been positively received and many seem to be finding it helpful as we cautiously emerge from the current pandemic, and start to think about those current and future digitisation projects. For ease of reference, the following is a bit of a round-up on what we’ve created so far:

    How to Write When You’ve Got a Need

    Funding expert, Debbie Cooper, tells us exactly what funders are looking for in a successful funding bid. Click here.

    Funding Resource Pack

    A downloadable pack of resources focused on securing funding, to include top tips from industry experts and a range of comprehensive guides. Click here.

    Digitisation: Inhouse vs Outsourcing

    A neat and thorough analysis by Abby Matthews, Centre Manager, and Julia Parks, Project Manager, on the options available when it comes to digitisation. Click here.

    Top Tips for Digitisation: Inhouse vs Outsourced

    A downloadable PDF resource containing Abby and Julia’s 10 top tips for inhouse and outsourced digitisation projects. Click here.

  • New online exhibition: Women and Power? A Magdalen Story

    A new online exhibition from Magdalen College Library and Archive has been launched, based on the Old Library exhibition from Sept 2019 which marked 40 years of co-education here.

    Women and Power? A Magdalen Story. An online exhibition curated by Dr Charlotte Berry, William Shire and Prof Siân Pooley. Magdalen College, Oxford

    https://womenandpower.magd.ox.ac.uk/

     'Women and Power? A Magdalen Story' formed a central part of the College's celebrations in 2019-20 to mark 40 years since women were admitted as equal members of Magdalen. The exhibition was launched in the Old Library for the 40th anniversary of co-education alumni weekend of 14/15th Sept 2019. It also marked the end of a major College oral history project during summer 2019 and a campaign to collect in new archive materials from College alumni.

    We have had to work hard to uncover the narratives of the women who have been closely connected with Magdalen since the 15th century. Magdalen's women were peripheral and often disempowered, but they were always here.

    This exhibition raises questions about how power has been gendered at Magdalen College, Oxford, over more than 560 years. Why has power been dominated by men in institutions such as Magdalen? How have women accepted, used and resisted power structures within the College? In what contexts have women found ways to shape Magdalen, for themselves, for their peers and for future generations? 

    Who speaks and who is heard are essential political questions for any community. One aim for 'Women and Power? A Magdalen Story' was to stimulate debate on how we build inclusive, diverse and meaningful communities, for today and for the future. We hope that the new online version for 2021 will help to widen this much-needed conversation.  

    Please do explore the different tabs - we found a huge variety of relevant material in the college archives and also ran an oral history project and archive collecting campaign, to add to our collections and the voices represented in our student, staff, fellow and alumni communities.

  • Free resources and training on caring for audio collection material

    New, free online resources and training on caring for audio materials, aimed at non-specialist collection holders. Sound recording technology has been with us for well over a century, and it’s extremely common to find small quantities of tapes, discs and other formats in gallery, library, archive and museum collections around the UK and beyond, often held as part of larger, more traditional collections.

    Few professional staff in these institutions have received training in how to care for and make use of sound items, and as a result they are often relegated to the back of the shelf, waiting for a day that never comes. Many sound formats are endangered however, due to the looming unavailability of the necessary playback equipment, and so the time we have in which to finally tackle these collection items is limited, to a few years at most.

    The UK-wide Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project is launching a series of online resources and activities, to help collection holders understand and care for their sound collections.

    Free training

    From late May and throughout the summer, a series of over 40 free training events will be offered, mostly online. They will be led by ten regional sound preservation centres around the UK, helping collection holders of all kinds to preserve and use their sound collections more effectively.

    Events and dates will be announced throughout the summer. Click here for an up to date list of the online courses on offer. For physical training events in your area, switch off the Eventbrite “Search for online events” filter.

    Free online resource

    A series of nine introductory leaflets, produced by the British Library in partnership with project partners around the UK, breaks down the challenges of caring for sound collections into manageable topics, and points to further authoritative sources of information. They are freely available here.

    Free poster

    An excellent Unlocking Your Sound Heritage poster outlining simple, realistic steps towards successfully managing your sound collections will be sent free of charge to any UK collection holder on request. Just email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    Free advice

    Your local sound preservation centre will be happy to discuss any aspect of caring for or using sound collections with you.

  • AURA Workshop 3 videos now online

    In March, the AURA network hosted its third workshop, organised by the University of Edinburgh. This workshop was titled "Artificial Intelligence and Archives: What comes next?" I am writing to you to let you know that presentations given at the workshop are now available online.

    This third workshop had speakers from a range of specialisms, discussing topics from the ethics of AI use in archives, traditional AI techniques such as machine learning, and reflections on digital humanities.

    Recordings and slides are available here.

    The keynote presentation was given by Professor Andrew Prescott from the University of Glasgow and asked, "Can Archives make AI Better?" His talk is available here.

    Click here to join the AURA mailing list and receive the latest updates.

  • Find out more about the CEF eArchiving Building Block here

  • TNA Training Opportunity: Archives Respond - Reframe, Regear, Reset

    The COVID-19 pandemic is inevitably having an impact on budgets and will affect decisions for many years to come. Archives will be under increasing pressure to demonstrate their value and explore new ways to make savings and increase income from fundraising and trading. They will need to demonstrate both their understanding of budget pressures and how they are contributing to local agendas.

    Archives are well placed to respond to the key challenges facing councils as they manage a recovery from the pandemic. They are well placed to support initiatives aimed at increasing community development and tackling isolation.

    The National Archives is pleased to be able to offer a new four- part training programme which aims to provide archive leaders with the skills required to lay foundations internally so that required funding and resources can be secured.

    Who should attend this training programme:

    The target audience for this four-part programme is archivists working in any archive setting, local authority or independent. The sessions are aimed at people who are decision makers, those who are leading or involved in planning for their service. It will be of interest to people who are considering any of the following questions:

    * How do I reframe the priorities of my services in light of the impact of COVID-19?

    * What local needs should we and can we respond to?

    * What activities need to stop?

    * What do we continue and/or do more of?

    * Will we remain financially viable?

    * What expectations do our core funders and parent bodies have?

    This programme has been developed in response to these demands.  This training programme has been funded by The National Archives as part of our Archives Unlocked strategy to support the sector.

    Click here to find out more about the training and to register your place.

    If you have any questions about this training programme, please contact  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • ARA Annual Conference 2021: WE LOVE RECORDS - Sustainability, Diversity, Advocacy

    One conference; three themed days; five parallel streams; 100 speakers; 20 hours of content; 30 days to catch up on demand from the comfort of your own home!

    We are very pleased to open registration for the ARA Annual Conference 2021

    Our first virtual conference has been carefully designed to provide you with access to many more hours of live and recorded content and commentary, with all sessions available to view for up to 30 days after the conference closes.

    The online format means that there are more ways to join the conference than ever before.  A flat fee of £95 for members and £150 for non-members will give you access to the live conference sessions and to the recorded content which means that, for the first time, you can join all the parallel sessions in your own time.

    A new Institutional Pass will allow up to six colleagues to attend together and allows you to extend the invitation to members of your team who would not ordinarily be able to attend.

    We hope that our virtual conference will allow many more members, non-members and colleagues from overseas to join us and we look forward to extending a warm welcome to first-time attendees. 

    When we last met, for our 2019 conference, we agreed to examine our profession and our beliefs.  Who are 'we' and why should we 'love records'?  This year, through our key themes of Sustainability, Diversity and Advocacy, we will explore those questions and look at how record-keepers and records can make a difference in turbulent times.

    Click here to register to attend.  Speaker and programme updates will also be posted at this link and we’ll share news of bursaries when they become available.  

  • Registration now open for new Novice to Know-How course: Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content

    The Digital Preservation Coalition is pleased to announce that registration is now open for a new Novice to Know-How course “Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content”.

    Part of The National Archives’ digital capacity building strategy, ‘Plugged In, Powered Up,’ the Novice to Know-How learning pathway aims to provide beginners with the skills required to develop and implement simple digital preservation workflows within their organisation.

    The new course on ‘Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content’ aims to provide learners with an understanding of the broad range of issues to be considered when providing access, as well as the ability to implement simple access provisions. By the end of the course, learners will also have gained the skills needed to achieve level one of The Born-Digital Levels of Access, and the basic-level requirements of the Discovery and Access section of the DPC’s Rapid Assessment Model. The course includes modules on User Needs Analysis, Accessibility, Resource Discovery, Managing IPR, Setting-Up an Access Workstation, and more.

    The course will be integrated into the main learning pathway for those registering for the April 2021 intake onwards. It will also be available as a stand-alone course for those who completed the original learning pathway prior to April and wish to “top-up” their learning, or for those specifically interested in the topic of providing access but do not want to complete the full learning pathway.

    As with the original learning pathway, priority places are available for learners from the UK Archives Sector or DPC Members. Registration is now open for April, May, and June.

    Click here to find out more and register for the full Novice to Know-How learning pathway or ‘Providing Access to Preserved Digital Content.’

  • Historic Environment Scotland’s Digital Projects showcase

    Join Historic Environment Scotland in celebrating the end of a four year project through which we have preserved and made available online over half a million items.

    Beyond the Physical: Future Proofing Scotland’s Heritage in the Digital Age will take you on a photo-illustrated journey through some of the newly available collections, presented under three themes: Hidden Treasures, Under the Soil and Preserving the Historic Environment.

    Historic Environment Scotland Archives’ Digital Projects was formed in 2017, comprising a small team of HES Archives staff, with the dual aim of making HES Archives collections accessible for all and strengthening our long-term preservation practises.

    We had two key remits:

    • To digitise our at-risk physical collections that were previously uncatalogued or only available for consultation via our Searchroom in Edinburgh.
    • To catalogue and make available our digital archive material deposited with us for inclusion in Scotland’s National Record for the Historic Environment.

Since our formation we have digitised 534,340 photographs, processed around 425,000 items and added over 377,600 items to the Digital Archive. In doing so, we have increased HES’s archival material by over 107%. You can view the Beyond the Physical | Canmore online showcase here

  • Learn Live with Parliament - Votes for Women By Mari Takayanagi, Senior Archivist, UK Parliamentary Archives

    The latest ARA Learning blogpost is now live.

    The Parliamentary Archives holds the historic records of the UK House of Commons and House of Lords, from 1497 to present day – some 13km of paper and parchment, plus more than 20TB of digital. The physical records are held in the Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster – a beautiful but cramped building. Space constraints make it very difficult for us to bring schoolchildren to the archives, so we were delighted to work with Parliament’s Education and Engagement team on ‘Learn Live’!

  • New group training offers from Rebuilding Heritage covering: Financial Literacy, Digital Marketing, Workplace Inclusion 

  • Rebuilding Heritage is a free support programme, funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, to help the heritage sector respond to the ongoing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • In the next round of support from Rebuilding Heritage the programme will now offer group training on financial literacy, digital marketing for freelancers and workplace inclusion, in addition to offers of support in business planning, communications, fundraising, legal issues, leadership and wellbeing.

    New for Round 4:

  • Financial Literacy training in a group session with Creative United

Through this training you will look at the practicalities involved with day to day budget management, learn how to create and use cashflow templates, and review approaches to financial risk management.

  • Digital Marketing for Heritage Freelancers training in a group session with Media Trust

This training will respond specifically to the challenges raised by the pandemic and will look at opportunities for marketing beyond your existing networks and word-of-mouth approaches, and methods of expanding your audiences and engaging new clients.

  • Join the next #HeritageDigitalNow virtual day

    Sign up for Heritage Digital’s next #HeritageDigitalNow virtual day which will focus on engaging online audiences in 2021 and beyond.

    Here's just a few reasons why you should sign up:

    • Sessions run by expert speakers, with tailored heritage content!
    • Get your questions answered: extended Q&As after every session
    • Virtual networking with other heritage professionals
    • It's completely free for all heritage organisations!

    Click here to find out more and sign up.

    Heritage Digital is funded by The National Lottery Heritage Fund as part of the Digital Skills for Heritage initiative.

  • eArchiving in Action: workshop recordings now available

    In January 2021, the CEF eArchiving Building Block held a three-day workshop to showcase how eArchiving is tackling the issues of long-term accessibility of information. Aimed at data producers, archives and solution providers, eArchiving in Action included a range of presentations, interviews, use cases and panel discussions. Open Preservation Foundation (OPF) helped to coordinate and host the event, presented work on validation, and conducted an interview with The UK National Archives’ John Sheridan on Managing Digital Preservation Risks.

    The aim of eArchiving is to provide the core specifications, software, training and knowledge to help data creators, software developers and digital archives tackle the challenge of short, medium and long-term data management and reuse in a sustainable, authentic, cost-efficient, manageable and interoperable way.

    Visit the event page to access the recordings and slides from the event.  

  • Archives for Learning and Education Section (ALES): ARA Learning Blog - Learn with Lorna

    The Highland Archive Service, operated by High Life Highland, cares for historic documents dating from the 1200s to the present day in its four archive centres in Inverness, Wick, Fort William and Portree. When the UK went into lockdown in March 2020, the service needed to find different ways to proactively engage with its local and international audiences across its digital platforms – maintaining the service’s profile and raising awareness of the important role of archives in society.A series of weekly collection-based films was developed. Delivered by Community Engagement Officer, Lorna Steele, under the banner ‘Learn with Lorna’, there are now 52 films available to watch on the High Life Highland YouTube channel.   Find out more about Learn with Lorna series here.

  • Cultural Diversity Competency: A free workshop where you’ll be challenged to examine personal perceptions that might surprise you and you’ll be introduced to strategies that will increase your ability to practice inclusion. This webcast provides the four skills to employ CDC and the five stages individuals and organisations can implement to improve relations with internal and external communities. https://www.pathlms.com/saa/courses/4839 

  • Australian Society of Archivists: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Managing Archives: a new self-directed, globally accessible online course for archivists and recordkeeping professionals. Trauma-informed practice is a useful model to consider for professional archival practice that puts the focus on people within archives ensuring best practice access regimes, improved policies and practices, and support for everyone who works and uses the archives. You can watch a webinar about the course here. The course helps raise awareness of the effects of vicarious trauma and emotional labour and the need for resources to support people within the archival profession.

    https://www.archivists.org.au/learning-publications/online-courses?utm_source=ASA&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Trauma-Informed%20-%20OLPage&utm_content=ARA%20UK%20and%20Ireland#Toolkits